Jean's Take

A blog about words, women, & whimsy

Category: movies

*Everybody’s Fine, 2009, and Robert DeNiro

Everybody’s Fine’, starring Robert DeNiro is a fine film for Father’s Day. I must warn you, however, that I have a friend who won’t watch DeNiro in anything because of his ‘trash talking’ of President Trump. I wasn’t too surprised by it. I’ve watched him in the past on Letterman and he has trouble with conversation. Don’t you think that sometimes people who have trouble putting words together are very good with four-letter ones–and gestures? And let’s face it, in his craft he works with a script. But, should we judge artists by their private lives and actions–or their lack of ability to express themselves properly? That’s a real ponder . . . . .

Since Ring Cycle season is coming up at the Met, Richard Wagner comes to mind. By all reports, he was a nasty, unkind man with few scruples. He absconded with his best friend’s wife, rubbed shoulders with the Nazis and belched when he ate, but he wrote some of the most wondrous music ever written and is a towering figure in his art. I don’t approve of what he was but I could never cut him from my life.

On the other hand, Robert DeNiro is little more than a ‘Raging Bull’. I could easily join my friend and give DeNiro up–he’s done little that I fancy–but if I had, I would have missed his fine performance in Everybody’s Fine. DeNiro plays Frank, a recent widower and recent retired factory worker (he coated power wires with PVC tubing) who is expecting his four children home for a little reunion. When they begin to cancel at the last minute, he packs a bag and, against doctor’s advice, goes on a road trip to visit them. He winds up learning a lot about his children but even more about himself.

And my question? Well, I’m still pondering . . . . . . .  How about you?

Favorite moment: With Frank in the art store when he is shown his son’s painting of telephone poles.

*Written and Directed by Kirk Jones who adapted it from an Italian film, supporting cast includes Drew Barrymore, Sam Rockwell and Kate Beckinsale

Rating: 3 carats 

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Enchanted April, 1991, 101 mins.

The only way to have a Women’s Film Club is to show strong women’s films.  Enchanted April  is one of my favorites.  It’s a 1922 book by Elizabeth von Arnim that became a Play that became a Musical that became an idyllic Woman’s Film.  To start with, it’s very pretty and we like pretty.  It’s focus is four women at crossroads—two are in drowsy marriages, one is a lonely widow tired of just living on memories, and one, a glamorous heiress bored with the artificiality in her life.  Can a man enjoy it?  Sure, but it’s only fully understood by a woman.  For example, can a man fully understand that anyone, for that matter, might like to spend a month with three women she just met, in a villa in Italy basking in the warm Mediterranean sun? Well, when I put it that way . . . maybe, but still not with the same sensitivities.

So when Lottie in rainy London sees an ad for a villa for rent in sunny Italy she knows she has to go.  She invites Rose who goes to the same women’s club and they advertise and get Caroline, an elegant upper-class beauty and Mrs. Fisher, a bossy aging widow.  By the end of the month, the husbands of Lottie and Rose have arrived, Caroline is enchanted by the villa owner and Mrs. Fisher has new friends.

Favorite Moment:  As they leave, Mrs. Fisher sticks her wooden cane down in the dirt and moves forward—not looking back–and we are left to watch the cane burst forth with colorful flora symbolic of new beginnings for all.  In other words, it has a ‘happy ever after’ ending that is quite satisfying.

Director:  Mike Newell.  Cast includes Miranda Richardson, Josie Lawrence, Joan Plowright, Alfred Molina, Michael Kitchen and Jim Broadbent.

Froth:  Dame Joan Plowright is also Baroness Olivier, the widow of Sir|Baron Laurence Olivier and is a distinguished English actress in her own right.   She retired not long after making this film when she lost her sight from macular degeneration.

Thought to ponder:  Why do you think the women invited their husbands on their holiday?

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